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On Saying Please questions and answers 12th | On saying please pdf

on saying please questions and answers 12th | On saying please pdf

on saying please questions and answers 12th | On saying please pdf

on saying please questions and answers 12th | On saying please pdf

Question 1. List the words of courtesy that we use in our daily life. Discuss them with your partner and explain the purpose of using each.

 
Answer:


Question 2. Listed below are a few character traits of people. Some are positive traits, while others are not. Tick [✓] the ones you feel are desirable

Answer:
  

Question 3. Etiquette and manners are very important for a person to live in the society. Read the following and put them in proper columns:

  1. To receive phone calls while you are in a lecture or class.
  2. To knock before you enter your Principal’s office.
  3. To thank the person who offers you tea or coffee.
  4. To be polite and courteous to others.
  5. To leave the classroom without the teacher’s permission.
  6. To occupy the seats reserved for ladies or physically challenged or elderly people on a bus or a train.
Answer:
AppropriateInappropriate
1. To knock before you enter your Principal’s office.1. To receive phone calls while you are in a lecture or class.
2. To thank the person who offers you tea or coffee.2. To leave the classroom without the teacher’s permission.
3. To be polite and courteous to others.3. To occupy the seats reserved for ladies or physically challenged or elderly people on a bus or a train.

[A1] On saying please

Question [i] Form groups and explain the following words with examples:

Answer:
1. Humility: being free from pride and arrogance – greatest example our former President Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam – remember that ‘pride comes before a fall’ – always realize that there are people better than you are – Socrates said ‘One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing. ’
2. Self-esteem: self-respect; confidence in one’s own worth or abilities – accept oneself as one is – everyone is different and unique – highly positive quality – leads to achievements, success, healthy relationships – can be developed with a little effort.
3. Gratitude: thankfulness for something that you have got – ready to show appreciation for something – towards the Almighty, towards those who have helped you – strengthens relationships with others – creates positivity.
4. Courtesy: means good manners and polite behavior – means being kind and compassionate towards others – should be real, not artificial – creates good impression – one will be liked by all – human quality not present in animals.
5. Generosity: kindness; big-heartedness – the act of being kind, selfless and giving towards others – very positive trait – influences others – when one is generous, one feels good – many religions consider this a great virtue – encourage charity.
6. Sympathy: feelings of pity and sorrow for someone else’s misfortune – leads to stronger relationships – offering condolences when someone dies – helps us to bond with others-makes the other person’s distress less – beautiful emotion – should be developed.
7. Empathy: the ability to understand and share the feelings of another – putting yourself in the shoes of the other person – different from kindness or pity – listen when people talk – see things from the other person’s point of view – makes one a very humane person.

Question [ii] Have a Group Discussion on the topic ‘The need of soft skills at the workplace’. Use the following points:

Answer:
[a] Written and verbal communication [writing notes, letters, memos, reports, instructions, speeches, presentations, etc.]
[b] Ways of interacting with others [showing courtesy, sympathy, cooperation, empathy, strictness, gratitude, humility, team work, etc.]
[c] Creative abilities [preparing reports, presentations, letters, etc.]
[d] Emotional intelligence [showing understanding, compassion, empathy, team work, motivation, self-awareness, etc.]

[A2] On saying please

Question [i] Read the text and state whether the following statements are True or False. Correct the False statements.

[a] Bitter problems in day-to-day life can be solved by sweet words.
[b] Great wars could have been avoided by a little courtesy.
[c] Observance of etiquette in a normal situation is important but more important is their observance when the situation is adverse.
[d] Words like ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ help us in making our passage through life uneasy.
[e] The law permits anybody to use violence, if another person is discourteous.
Answer:
True statements:
[a] Bitter problems in day-to-day life can be solved by sweet words.
[b] Great wars could have been avoided by a little courtesy.
[c] Observance of etiquette in a normal situation is important but more important is their observance when the situation is adverse.

False statements:

[d] Words like ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ help us in making our passage through life uneasy.
[e] The law permits anybody to use violence, if ; another person is discourteous.

Corrected statements :

[d] Words like ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ help us in making our passage through life easy.
[e] The law does not permit anybody to use violence, if another person is discourteous.

Question [ii] Select the most appropriate sentences which suggest the theme of the essay.

[a] The essay tells us about courtesy, civility, morality, responsibility and control.
[b] The essay explores the difficulties that can be incurred by an individual when dealing with the public.
[c] One can keep one’s peace of mind without having to lower themselves to the level of the perceived offender.
[d] People with low self-esteem are generally difficult to work with and they look down upon others to get a feeling of superiority.
Answer:
[a] The essay tells us about courtesy, civility, morality, responsibility and control.
[c] One can keep one’s peace of mind without having to lower themselves to the level of the
perceived offender.

[iii]

Question [a] Find the reasons for the liftman’s uncivilized behaviour.

Answer:
Reasons for the liftman’s uncivilized behaviour when the passenger was rude and ill-mannered towards him:

he was acutely hurt by the slur cast by the passenger on his social status
the passenger’s discourtesy was a wound to his self-respect
he felt insulted by the passenger’s discourtesy.

Question [b] List the people and their behaviour that made the passenger rude and ill- mannered.

  
Answer:
The people who made the passenger rude and ill-mannered:
[housemaid] → [cook] → [employer’s wife] → [employer] → [passenger] → [lift-man]

Question [iv] Good manners are required in our daily life for making our social contacts more cooperative and friendly. Illustrate the behaviour of the polite conductor with different people in various situations.
  
Answer:
SituationBehaviour
1. The writer’s sensitive toe was trampled onThe conductor said sorry with an apology and courtesy.
2. In the rainy season dealing with peopleHe would run up the stairs to give someone the tip that there was “room inside”.
3. Dealing with old peopleHe was as considerate as a son.
4. Dealing with childrenHe was as solicitous as a father.
5. Dealing with young peopleHe always indulged in some merry jest with them.
6. Dealing with a blind manHe set him down safely on the pavement and then took him wherever he wanted to go, after telling the driver to wait for a while.

Question [v] Discuss and Write the impact of good temper and kindliness on society in the light of the good-mannered conductor.

Answer:
The conductor was always cheerful and kind-hearted to everyone in the bus. This spread to his passengers and they too became cheerful and good-humored. They would naturally pass on this feeling after getting off the bus. Thus, in society, if people are good-tempered, cheerful and kind, it will spread to others and they too will start behaving in a similar manner. This will lead to a happy and compassionate society.

Question [vi] ‘A modest calling can be made dignified by good temper and kindly feeling’. Explain the statement with examples.

Answer:
This means that whatever career or job one has, however simple or modest, it can be made more dignified by behaving in a good- tempered and cheerful manner and with kindliness towards the people one comes in contact with. For example, even a simple job like that of a security guard at a mall can be made pleasant and dignified if the guard smiles and says ‘Thank you’ or ‘Good morning’ every time he/she checks a person.

A sweeper’s job can also be made more dignified if he/she just nods and smiles at passers-by or helps them if they are in need.

Question [vii] The service of the police is necessary for the implementation of law in our society. Do you think you require this service for a good social environment? Discuss and write.

Answer:
No, we cannot have the police monitoring us for social and moral offences. For example, one cannot be punished if one refuses to smile at an acquaintance or say Thank you’. One cannot be punished if one doesn’t hold the door open for the person who is following.

These are good manners, or courtesy, and they have to be taught right from childhood, and they will change in different cultures and different circumstances. Whether a person follows them or not depends on the individual. However, if these little courtesies are followed, life will become much simpler and more pleasant for everyone.

[A3] On saying please 

Question [a] Find out the words in Column B which collocate with the words in Column A:

Answer:
ABAnswer
regularmealregular exercise
mid dayconceptmid-day meal
keyfoodkey concept
fastexercisefast food
trydecoratedtry hard
richlyhardrichly decorated
freejamfree time
traffictimetraffic jam
socialanimalsocial justice
wildjusticewild animal

Question [b] Learning collocations is essential for making your English sound fluent and natural. Make the following collocations and use them in your own sentences.

 
Sentences:
[1] BIG:

It was a big mistake to hold a party on a rainy day.
“Did you get a big surprise when you saw me?” asked the little girl to her mother.
There was a big welcome waiting for the winning team.
The hungry beggar prayed that he would get a big meal at the rich man’s home.
Writing the difficult exam was no big deal for the intelligent boy.
Rohan realized that it would be a big challenge for him to win the match.
The discovery of a new element was big news in the scientific community.
Losing the beauty contest was a big shock for the arrogant girl.
[2] WELL :

The well-dressed man jumped over the puddle carefully.
The advice the teacher gave Rita was well-meant, but Rita did not like it.
The cook was happy to see the well-stocked cupboard.
Little Naina was well-pleased with her birthday gift.

Question [ii] Sometimes while using a word in a sentence, we have to change its word class. we can make several more words from the root word.

we can make several new words from the root word.
I asked Sumit to ……………. my pencil for me. [sharp].
I asked Sumit to sharpen my pencil for me.

Question 1. Now read the following sentences and use the words given in the brackets. Change the word class and rewrite the sentences.
[a] Leena was eating a very …………. apple and obviously enjoying it. [crunch]
[b] This picture looks …………… [colour]
[c] I’m afraid that your behaviour is just not ……………. [accept]
[d] I like my elder brother. He is very ……………. [help]
Answer:
[a] Leena was eating a very crunchy apple and obviously enjoying it.
[b] This picture looks colourful.
[c] I’m afraid that your behaviour is just not acceptable.
[d] I like my elder brother. He is very helpful.

Complete the following table. Put a cross if a word class does not exist.


Question [iii] Write appropriate expressions and words you have to use while facing an interview :

Answer:
[a] May I come in?
[b] May I have a seat?
[c] Thank you.
[d] I’m sorry, but I did not catch what you said.
[5] Please let me know

Question [b] You are writing a letter of complaint. List the proper expressions that you would like to write.

Answer:

I disagree.
I’m sorry to say that….
I would like to suggest….
This was not expected from a company like yours.
Please replace the defective piece as soon as possible.

Question [iv] Distinguish between a legal offence and a moral offence on the basis of the extract.

 
Answer:
Legal offenceMoral offence
BurglaryRude behaviour
AssaultDiscourtesy
BatteryHaughtiness
Laceration of one’s feelings

Question [v] Find out the meaning of the phrase ‘give and take’ and use it in your own sentence.

Answer:
give-and-take – Meaning: exchange of ideas Sentence – The TV stars engaged in an interesting give-and-take which was enjoyed by the audience.

Question [vi] Complete the table with polite expressions that we must use in our day-to-day life:
  
Answer:
Don’tsDos
I want a cup of tea.I would like to have a cup of tea.
Send me the mail.Please send me the mail.
Go away or leave me alone.Please let me be by myself.
You are wrong.Are you sure you’re right?
That’s a bad idea.That is not a very good idea, is it?
Your work isn’t good.Your work can do with some improvement

[A4]

Question [i] Edit the given paragraph using a/ an/the wherever necessary:
Rakesh is a/an ideal son who remains devoted to his father as he grows professionally to become a/the famous doctor. As his father grows old, he takes care to spend time with his father, bringing him tea in a/the morning and taking him out for a/the walk in an/the evening.
Answer:
Rakesh is an ideal son who remains devoted to his father as he grows professionally to become a famous doctor. As his father grows old, he takes care to spend time with his father, bringing him tea in the morning and taking him out for a walk in the evening.

Question [ii] Spot the errors in each of the following sentences and correct the incorrect ones:

Question [a] Radha brought pens and distributed them between her five children.

Answer:
Radha bought pens and distributed them among her five children.

Question [b] Jayshree and Sujata sat besides each other in complete silence.

Answer:
Jayshree and Sujata sat beside each other in complete silence.

Question [c] His best friend Vijay was blind within one eye.

Answer:
His best friend Vijay was blind in one eye.

Question [d] One could dare to encroach on his rights.

Answer:
One could not dare to encroach on his rights.

Question [e] She was taken with surprise when she saw the famous Taj Mahal.

Answer:
She was taken by surprise when she saw the famous Taj Mahal.

Question [f] It is not possible to exchange the goods once the sale has been completed.

Answer:
It is not possible to exchange goods once the sale has been completed, [‘the’ is deleted.]

Question [g] Dr. Sengupta has been trying to master the craft for the last five years.

Answer:
No error in this sentence.

Question [h] The top-ranking candidates will be appointed in senior jobs in banks.

Answer:
The top-ranking candidates will be appointed | to senior jobs in banks.

Question [i] She knows very well what is expected from her but she is unable to perform.

Answer:
She knows very well what is expected of her but she is unable to perform.

Question [j] They will put on a note in this regard for your consideration.

Answer:
They will put up a note in this regard for your consideration.

Question [iii] Read the following.

Santosh purchased a computer. He read the operating manual and followed the instructions.
[a] He linked the monitor, keyboard and printer.
[b] He plugged in the main cable.
[c] He switched on the monitor at the back.
[d] When the light appeared on the screen, he placed the Day Disk in Drive A.
[e] He pushed in the disk until the button clicked out.
[It took about 30 seconds for the computer to load the program.]
[f] He pressed the Drive button and the disk shot out.
[g] He replaced the Day Disk with the Document Disk.
[h] He pressed function key 7.
Convert these sentences into passive voice by filling in the blanks.

Firstly the monitor, keyboard and printer were linked up. Then the main cable was plugged in. The monitor was switched on at the back. When the light appeared on the screen, the Day Disk was placed in Drive A. The disk was pushed in until the button clicked out. It took the computer 30 seconds to load the program. The drive button was pressed and the disk shot out. The Day Disk was replaced with the Document Disk. Finally, the function key 7 was pressed. The word processor was then ready to use.

[A5]  On saying please

Question [i] Write a speech on ‘Courtesy is the light of life’ with the help of the following points.

[a] People have a good impression of you.
[b] You will be acknowledged and appreciated by all.
[c] You will he happier and contented with life.
Answer:
Courtesy is the light of life
Dear friends,

Good morning. You may be surprised with the topic I have chosen for this speech, for today the word ‘Courtesy’ seems to be an old-fashioned word for us. But it is really the light of life. I, Shivam Goswami, would like to say a few words on why I think so.

First of all, what does courtesy mean? It means good manners and polite behaviour. It means being kind and compassionate towards someone. When you are courteous, people have a good impression of you; but that is not the reason for being courteous. Politeness should be real, and not artificial.

A courteous person will be appreciated by all. People will like to spend time with him/her and find pleasure in the person’s company. Someone may ask ‘What is courteous behaviour’? Saying simple words like ‘Please’, ‘Thank you’, ‘Excuse me’ and ‘Sorry’ is courteous behaviour. Helping a person who has fallen is courteous behaviour. Holding the lift door open for someone is courteous behaviour.

When a person is courteous, people are automatically courteous in return. This leads to a more polite and happier society. As I conclude, I would like to ask all of you to do something for a week: Be courteous. Then you will see the returns and realize the truth of what I am saying. Thank you for listening to me so patiently. Bye.

Question [ii] ‘Manners maketh man’ – Expand the idea in your own words with proper examples.

Answer:
Manners maketh man

‘Manners maketh Man’ : so goes a famous saying. In the world of today, people are judged by their manners and conduct. Manners distinguish us from animals, and make us human. A person who is courteous and considerate towards others is said to possess good manners. Such a person is respectful to his superiors, courteous to his equals and sympathetic towards his subordinates. He always shows concern for the well-being and comfort of others. He uses words like ‘Please’, ‘Thank you’ and ‘Sorry’ while talking to others; he helps senior citizens and those in need.

Everyone likes a person who speaks and behaves politely and treats others respectfully. Good manners cost practically nothing but can buy everything. They win us friends and help us influence people. They make the world a happier place to live in by reducing friction and avoiding tension.

When we meet a person for the first time, it is the person’s courtesy which impresses us deeply. Good manners are generally taught by parents at home, and by teachers in school. Manners that are learnt during childhood generally remain with us throughout our lives. They become a part of our personality. Hence, it is desirable that good manners are instilled in children when they are very young, so that they grow up to become courteous, considerate adults.

[A6]  On saying please

Question [i] Read A. G. Gardiner’s essay “The Open Window’ and compare its theme with the essay ‘On Saying “Please.”


Question [ii] ‘Nothing clears up my spirits like a fine day’ – Keats. Collect information of the poet Keats and write it in your notebook.

[A7]  On saying please

Question [i] Soft skills are required in all walks of life including careers and industries. They are increasingly becoming the essential skills of today’s workforce. Soft skills are an integral part of finding, attracting and retaining clients also. Highly developed presentation skills, networking abilities, and etiquette awareness can help you win new clients and gain more work. The following are considered the most important soft skills.

image

Question [ii] Following are some of the institutions where you will get the courses related to soft skills.
[a] Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, Gujarat
[b] Indian School of Business Management, Hyderabad
[c] XLRI – Xavier School of Management, Jamshedpur
[d] Indian Institute of Foreign Trade, New Delhi
Jobs available at –

Customer service centre
Management schools
Hotel industry, etc.
Yuvakbharati English 12th Digest Chapter 1.2 On Saying “Please” Additional Important Questions and Answers

Read the extract and complete the activities given below.:

Global Understanding:

Question 1. Read the following sentences and find out True and False sentences. Correct the false sentences:

1. The liftman invited the passenger into the lift.
2. If you knock down a burglar, the law will acquit you.
3. There is no legislation against bad manners.
4. The complainant had to pay a fine.
Answer:
True sentences:
2. If you knock down a burglar, the law will acquit you.
3. There is no legislation against bad manners.

False sentences:
1. The liftman invited the passenger into the lift.
4. The complainant had to pay a fine,

Corrected sentences:
1. The liftman threw the passenger out of the lift.
4. The liftman had to pay a fine.

Question 2. Explain the penalty, if any, that one has to pay if one is rude or boorish.

Answer:
There is no penalty to pay if one is rude or boorish except the penalty of being called a ill-mannered person.

Question 3. The behaviour of the people who made the passenger rude and ill-mannered:

Answer:
  

Question 4. Complete the following:

[The answers are given directly and underlined.]
Answer:

The first requirement of civility is that we should acknowledge a service.
The Underground Railway Company insists that their employees are civil.
The words which make life smooth are ‘please’ and ‘thank you’.
The job of a bus conductor is very difficult and sometimes painful.

Question 5. Tick mark the correct words:

[The answers are marked directly.]
Answer:

The author finally found/did not find the money for the ticket.
The author thought he had left home with/ without any money.
The conductor gave/did not give the author a ticket.
The author was pleased/displeased with the conductor.

Question 6. Complete the web by choosing the correct words from the brackets that describe the conductor: [mean cheerful considerate grumpy patient solicitous impatient polite irritable good-tempered haughty good-natured kind]

Answer:
  

Question 7. Complete the following :

[The answers are given directly and underlined.]
Answer:

A modest career can he made dignified by good temper and kindly feeling.
The law can only protect us against material] attack.
The narrator says he does not want to apologise for praising an unknown bus conductor.
A man who is polite may lose material advantage but he always has the spiritual victory.

Complex Factual:

Question 1. Explain what the liftman wanted the passenger to do, and what happened afterwards.

Answer:
The passenger, on entering the lift, said ‘Top’. The liftman wanted him to say ‘Top please’. The passenger refused to do so. The liftman, instead of taking him to the top floor, threw him out of the lift.

Question 2. Explain the sentence: The pain of a kick on the shins soon passes away but the pain of a wound to our self-respect or our vanity may poison a whole day.

Answer:
This means that if we are physically attacked i and injured, the pain of the wounds will soon heal and be forgotten. But if our self-respect or pride is hurt, it may poison our lives and behaviour for a much longer time.

Question 3. It is not possible for the law to become the guardian of our private manners. Explain.

Answer:
The area of moral offences is quite vast and no laws or commandments can cover this area. In addition, social civilities, speech and manners are of so many types and the interpretation of these [whether they are good or bad] is so different that no court could administer a law which governed them. Hence, it is not possible for the law to become the guardian of our private manners.

Question 4. Mention a couple of ways to keep the machine of life oiled and running sweetly.

Answer:
We can keep the machine of life oiled and running sweetly by using courteous words like ‘Please’ and ‘Thank you’ to acknowledge a service.

Question 5. Complete the following:
[The answer is given directly and underlined.]
Answer:
The public owes much to the Underground Railway Company because they insist on a certain standard of civility in their employees, and take care that the standard is observed.

Question 6. Complete the table:

Answer:
The wordsWho said!To whomWhen
1. “I haven’t a copper on me.”The narratorThe conductorWhen the conductor and the narrator found that he had left home without any money in his pocket.
2. “Oh, you’ll see me some day alright.”The conductorThe narratorWhen the narrator address) he could send the borrowed asked where (to which money.
3. “Where shall I send the fare?”The narratorThe conductorWhen the narrator wanted to repay the ticket money to the conductor.
4. “Where do you want to go?”The conductorThe narratorWhen the narrator explained that he did not have any money on him, and the conductor

Question 7. Write the narrator’s opinion about how the liftman should have dealt with the passenger’s uncivility. Give reasons for the same.

Answer:
In the opinion of the writer, the liftman, instead of throwing the passenger out of the lift, should have treated him with elaborate politeness. He would have then had the victory not only over the rude passenger, but also over himself, and that was the spiritual victory that was more important. His revenge would then have been more subtle and effective.

Inference/Interpretation/Analysis :

Question 1. Name the ‘unpleasant specimen’ mentioned in the extract and describe his behaviour.

Answer:
The ‘unpleasant specimen’ mentioned in the extract is the type of bus conductor who regards his passengers as natural enemies whose chief purpose on the bus is to cheat him, and who can only be kept honest by using a loud voice and an aggressive manner.

Question 2. Describe the stale old trick, according to the conductor.

Answer:
Pretending that you have forgotten your purse at home, and hence do not have the fare for the ticket is a stale old trick, according to the conductor. [The conductor does not say this the narrator only imagines that he may do so.]

Question 3. Describe the reactions of the bus conductor.

Answer:
No, the conductor did not think that the narrator was dishonest. He cheerfully accepted what the narrator said without doubting him and offered him a free ticket.

Question 4. Describe the experience which made the narrator comfortable in the bus.

Answer:
The conductor had trampled on the narrator’s sensitive toe, causing him pain and agony. However, the conductor had then explained matters and apologized so profusely that the narrator forgot his pain and anger. After this experience, the narrator always observed his constant good nature and cheerful behaviour with pleasure and felt comfortable in his presence.

Question 5. Describe the narrator’s justification of his praise of the conductor.

Answer:
The narrator says that if the famous poet Wordsworth could gain wisdom from a poor leech-gatherer, he sees no reason why ordinary people should not take lessons on conduct from a bus conductor, who shows how a modest job can be made more dignified by behaving in a good-tempered and cheerful manner and with kindliness towards the people one comes in contact with.


Personal Response:

Question 1. Describe a person you have come across who is always polite and helpful. What do you think about him/her?

Answer:
The security guard of our building is always polite and helpful. He will help senior citizens get in and out of their cars or into the lift; he will help any person who has heavy bags. He also replies politely to any question asked by anyone. We all like him very much and often share our chocolates and biscuits with him. We also give him books, stationery and toys for his little child.

Question 2. Describe a pleasant/unpleasant experience you have had with a bus conductor.

Answer:
This is an experience I had when I was new to Mumbai. I got into a bus and asked the conductor for a ticket to Dadar. The conductor shook his head and told me that I had got into the bus going in the wrong direction. He patiently explained that I would have to get off at the next stop, cross the road, and catch a bus having the same number but going in the opposite direction. He even pointed out the bus stop to me. Though I felt a bit embarrassed, I thanked him for his kindness.

Question 3. Give your opinion about the conductor’s behaviour.

Answer:
The conductor was really a good and kind human being who saw the best in everyone and believed everyone. He was ready to pay the fare for the narrator’s ticket himself, even though he was not sure whether it would be returned. It is difficult to find such generous and helpful people in the world today, and it leaves a very pleasant feeling in the heart when you do.

Language Study:

Question 1. The law does not compel me to say ‘Please’.

[Rewrite as an interrogative sentence.]
Answer:
Does the law compel me to say ‘Please’?

Question 2. It was a question of ‘Please’.

[Add a question tag.]
Answer:
It was a question of ‘Please’, wasn’t it?

Question 3. It will permit me to retaliate with reasonable violence.

[Pick out the finite and non-finite verbs.]
Answer:
will permit – finite verb;
to retaliate – non-finite verb [infinitive]

Question 4. The pain of a wound to our self-respect may poison a whole day.

[Pick out the auxiliary and state its function.]
Answer:
may – possibility

Question 5. For there are few things more catching than bad temper.

[Write the part of speech of the underlined word.]
Answer:
Gerund

Question 6. Bad manners probably do more to poison the stream of general life than all the crimes in the calendar. [Rewrite in the present perfect tense.]

Answer:
Bad manners have done probably more to poison the stream of general life than all the crimes in the calendar.

Question 7. There is a social practice much older and much more sacred than any law which enjoins us to be civil.

[Rewrite using ‘not only … but also… ’]
Answer:
There is a social practice not only much older but also much more sacred than any law which enjoins us to be civil.

Question 8. Most people will have a certain sympathy with him. [Rewrite using the verb form of the underlined word.]

Answer:
Most people will sympathize with him.

Question 9. Here and there you will meet an unpleasant specimen who regards the passengers as his natural enemies. [Replace the verb in the future tense with a modal auxiliary showing possibility.]

Answer:
Here and there you might meet an unpleasant specimen who regards the passengers as his natural enemies.

Question 10. I had left home without any money in my pocket. [Pick out the verb and state the tense.]

Answer:
had left-past perfect tense.

Question 11. I know that stale old trick.

[Rewrite beginning ‘That stale old trick ’.]
Answer:
That stale old trick is known to me.

Question 12. I said it was very kind of him.

[Identify the clauses.]
Answer:
I said – main clause
it was very kind of him – subordinate noun clause

Question 13. I began to observe him whenever I boarded his bus. [Pick out the subordinate clause and state the type.]

Answer:
subordinate clause – whenever I boarded his bus; adverb clause of time.

Question 14. He seemed to have an inexhaustible fund of patience and a gift for making his passengers comfortable. [Rewrite using ‘as well as…’]

Answer:
He seemed to have an inexhaustible fund of patience as well as a gift for making his passengers comfortable.

Question 15. In lightening their spirits he lightened his own task. [Rewrite using the verb form of the underlined word.]

Answer:
When he lightened their spirits he lightened his own task.

Question 16. A very modest calling may be dignified by good temper and kindly feeling. [Rewrite as an interrogative sentence.]

Answer:
Can’t a very modest calling be dignified by good temper and kindly feeling?

Question 17 “I never give the wall to a scoundrel,” said a man who met Chesterfield one day in the street. “I always do,” said Chesterfield, stepping with a bow into the road. [Rewrite using reported speech.]

Answer:
A man who met Chesterfield one day in the street said that he never gave the wall to a scoundrel. Chesterfield, stepping with a bow into the road, replied that he always did.

Question 18. The polite man may lose the material advantage, but he always has the spiritual victory. [Rewrite beginning ‘Though’]

Answer:
Though the polite man may lose the material advantage, he always has the spiritual victory.

Vocabulary:

Find out the meanings of the following phrases and use them in your own sentences.

Question 1. knock someone down –

Answer:
Meaning: to hit someone forcefully so that he/she falls down
Sentence: The young boy was so angry with the bully that he knocked him down.

Question 2. to comply with :

Answer:
Meaning: to obey.
Sentence: We must comply with the laws of the country we live in.

Question 3. Find out 2 words with prefixes and 2 with suffixes from the extract and write them down.

Answer:
1. Words with prefixes : discourtesy, uncivil.
2. Words with suffixes : instruction, reasonable.

Question 4. Complete the following:

Answer:

A liftman is a person who is employed to operate a lift.
An assailant is a person who attacks another person.
A complainant is a person who makes a formal complaint in a law court.
A burglar is a person who illegally enters houses and steals things.
Question 5.
Write the meanings of the following words :

redress
henpecked
black eye.
Answer:

redress – to set right to remedy.
henpecked – being controlled by and frightened of one’s wife.
black eye – an area of skin around the eye that has gone dark because it has been hit.

Question 6. Use the phrase ‘a black eye’ in your own sentence.

Answer:
When I saw my friend with a black eye, I knew that he had been in a fight with someone.

Question 7. Find out 2 words with suffixes and 2 compound words from the extract and write them down.

Answer:
1. words with suffixes: vanity, really.
2. Compound words: breakfast, housemaid.

Question 8. Write the meaning of the following words

  • endorse
  • verdict
  • resentment
  • calling
  • Answer:
  1. endorse – express support
  2. verdict – judgement
  3. resentment – anger
  4. calling – vocation or profession.

Question 9. Find out 2 words with suffixes from the extract and write them down.

Answer:
Words with suffixes : sympathy, requirement.

Question 10. Find out two words with prefixes and two with suffixes from the extract and write them down.

Answer:
1. Words with prefixes: unfriendliness, inconvenience
2. Words with suffixes: existence, discovery

Question 11. Pick out four adverbs of manner from the extract.

Answer:
coldly, cheerfully, luckily, easily.

Question 12. Write the meanings of the followings words:

countenance
treading
assured [someone]
benediction
uncouth
Answer:

countenance – face.’
treading – walking on.
assured [someone] – made something certain to someone.
benediction – a blessing.
uncouth – impolite, unrefined.

Question 13. Find out 2 words with prefixes and 2 with suffixes from the extract and write them down.

Answer:
1. words with prefixes: inexhaustible, unusually
2. words with suffixes: investment, cheerful

Question 14. Write the meaning of ‘moral affront’.

Answer:
moral affront: a deliberate offence or insult to one’s dignity or self-respect.

Question 15. Find out the meaning of the following phrase and use it in your own

sentence: lower than the angels
Answer:
lower than the angels – Meaning : less than perfect
Sentence: The unexpected behaviour of the religious men was somewhat lower than the angels.

Question 16. Write four words with suffixes from the extract and write them down.

Answer:
agreement, politeness, institution, sweeten.
Note: Students can find more words on their own.

Vocabulary:


A Collocation is a combination of words in a language that often go together. They habitually occur together and hence convey some meaning by association, e.g. early morning, hot dinner, fast train.


Non-Textual Grammar:

Do as directed:

Question 1. Hearing the sound of music from a side street, Mona had an idea.

[Rewrite as a compound sentence.]
Answer:
Mona heard the sound of music from a side-street and had an idea.

Question 2. Siddharth could not ask his father for a cricket bat.

[Rewrite using the antonym of ‘able’.]
Answer:
Siddharth was unable to ask his father for a cricket bat.

Question 3. “I will try,” the lady smiled.

[Rewrite in indirect speech.]
Answer:
The lady smiled and said that she would try.

Spot the error in the following sentences and rewrite them correctly:

Question 1. I picked some of the lovely, tasty fruits and had eaten my fill of them.

Answer:
I had picked some of the lovely, tasty fruits and had eaten my fill of them.

Question 2. I miss my friends a lots.

Answer:
I miss my friends a lot.

on saying please questions and answers 12th | On saying please pdf

Alfred George Gardiner (1865 to 1946) was born at Chelmsford in Essex in 1865. He started his literary career as a journalist. At the age of 37, he was appointed editor of the Daily News, London. Under the pseudonym (pen name) ‘Alpha of the Plough’, he made regular contributions to the Daily News, The Manchester Evening News etc. His essays are uniformly elegant, graceful and humorous. ‘The Pillars of Society’, ‘Pebbles on the Shore’, ‘Many Furrows and Leaves in the Wind’ are some of his best known writings.

 His uniqueness lies in his ability to teach the basic truths of life in an easy and amusing manner. He raised the question of morality in everyday life. In, On Saying ‘‘Please’’, he points out the value of good manners in social life and emphasizes the importance of courtesy and politeness in daily behaviour. He shows how polite speech and manner sweeten the atmosphere around and how discourtesy and ill manners spoil or pollute it

on saying please questions and answers 12th | On saying please pdf

On Saying “Please” The young lift-man in a City office who threw a passenger out of his lift the other morning and was fined for the offence was undoubtedly in the wrong. It was a question of “Please.” The complainant entering the lift, said, “Top.” The lift-man demanded “Top-please,” and this concession being refused he not only declined to comply with the instruction, but hurled the passenger out of the lift. This, of course was carrying a comment on manner too far. Discourtesy is not a legal offence, and it does not excuse assault and battery.

 If a burglar breaks into my house and I knock him down, the law will acquit me, and if I am physically assaulted, it will permit me to retaliate with reasonable violence. It does this because the burglar and my assailant have broken quite definite commands of the law. But no legal system could attempt to legislate against bad manners, or could sanction the use of violence against something which it does not itself recognize as a legally punishable offence. 

And our sympathy with the liftman, we must admit that the law is reasonable. It would never do if we were at liberty to box people’s ears because we did not like their behaviour, or the tone of their voices, or the scowl on their faces. Our fists would never be idle, and the gutters of the city would run with blood all day. I may be as uncivil as I may please and the law will protect me against violent retaliation. I may be haughty or boorish and there is no penalty to pay except the penalty of being written down an ill-mannered fellow. 

The law does not compel me to say “Please” or to attune my voice to other people’s sensibilities any more than it says that I shall not wax my moustache or dye my hair or wear ringlets down my back. It does not recognize the laceration of our feelings as a case for compensation. There is no allowance for moral and intellectual damages in these matters. This does not mean that the damages are negligible. It is probable that the lift-man was much more acutely hurt by what he regarded as a slur upon his social standing than he would have been if he had a kick on the shins, for which he could have got a legal redress. 

The pain of a kick on the shins soon passes away but the pain of a wound to our self-respect or our vanity may poison a whole day. I can imagine that lift-man, denied the relief of throwing the author of his wound out of the lift, brooding over the insult by the hour, and visiting his wife in the evening as the only way of restoring his equilibrium. For there are few things more catching than bad temper and bad manners. When Sir Anthony Absolute bullied Captain Absolute, the latter went out and bullied his man, Fag, whereupon Fag went out downstairs and kicked the pageboy. 

Probably the man who said “Top” to the lift-man was really only getting back on his employer who had not said “Good morning” to him because he himself had been henpecked at breakfast by his wife, to whom the cook had been insolent because the housemaid had “answered her back”. We infect the world with our ill-humours. Bad manners probably do more to poison the stream of the general life than all the crimes in the calendar.

 For one wife who gets a black eye from an otherwise goodnatured husband there are a hundred who live a life of martyrdom under the shadow of a morose temper. But all the same the law cannot become the guardian of our private manners. No Decalogue could cover the vast area of offences and no court could administer a law which governed our social civilities, our speech, the tilt of our eyebrows and all our moods and manners. But though we are bound to endorse the verdict against the lift-man, most people will have a certain sympathy with him. While it is true that there is no law that compels us to say “Please”, there is a social practice much older and much more sacred than any law which enjoins us to be civil. 

And the first requirement of civility is that we should acknowledge a service. “Please” and “Thank you” are the small change with which we pay our ways as social beings. They are the little courtesies by which we keep the machine of life oiled and running sweetly. They put our intercourse upon the basis of a friendly co-operation, an easy give-and-take, instead of on the basis of superiors dictating to inferiors. It is a very vulgar mind that would wish to command where he can have the service for asking, and have it with willingness and good-feeling instead of resentment. I should like to “feature” in this connection my friend, the polite conductor. 

By this discriminating title I do not intend to suggest a rebuke to conductors generally. On the contrary, I am disposed to think that there are few classes of men who come through the ordeal of a very trying calling better than bus conductors do. Here and there you will meet an unpleasant specimen who regards the passengers as his natural enemies - as creatures whose chief purpose on the bus is to cheat him, and who can only be kept reasonably honest by a loud voice and an aggressive manner.

 But this type is rare - rarer than it used to be. I fancy the public owes much to the Underground Railway Company, which also runs the buses, for insisting on a certain standard of civility in its servants and taking care that standard is observed. In doing this it not only makes things pleasant for the travelling public, but performs an important social service. It is not, therefore, with any feeling of unfriendliness to conductors as a class that I pay a tribute to a particular member of that class. I first became conscious of his existence one day when I jumped on to a bus and found that 

I had left home without any money in my pocket. Everyone has had the experience and knows the feeling, the mixed feeling, which the discovery arouses. You are annoyed because you look like a fool at the best and like a knave at the worst. You would not be at all surprised if the conductor eyed you coldly as much as to say, “Yes, I know that stale old trick. Now then, off you get.’’ And even if the conductor is a good fellow and lets you down easily, you are faced with the necessity of going back, and the inconvenience, perhaps, of missing your train or your engagement. 

Having searched my pockets in vain for stray coppers, and having found I was utterly penniless, I told the conductor with as honest a face as I could assume that I couldn’t pay the fare, and must go back for money. “Oh you needn’t get off: that’s all right,” said he. “All right,” said I, “but I haven’t a copper on me.” “Oh, I’ll book you through,” he replied. “Where d’ye want to go?” and he handled his bundle of tickets with the air of a man who was prepared to give me a ticket for anywhere from the Bank to Hong Kong. I said it was very kind of him, and told him where I wanted to go, and as he gave me the ticket I said, “But where shall I send the fare?” 

“Oh, you’ll see me some day all right,” he said cheerfully, he turned to go. And then, luckily, my fingers, still wandering in the corner of my pockets lighted on a shilling and the account was squared. But that fact did not lessen the glow of pleasure which so good-natured an action had given me. A few days after, my most sensitive toe was trampled on rather heavily as I sat reading on the top of a bus. I looked up with some anger and more agony, and saw my friend of the cheerful countenance. “Sorry, sir,” he said. “I know these are heavy boots. Got’ em because my own feet get trod on so much, and now I’m treading on other people’s. 

Hope I didn’t hurt you, sir.” He had hurt me but he was so nice about it that I assured him he hadn’t. After this I began to observe him whenever I boarded his bus, and found a curious pleasure in the constant good-nature of his bearing. He seemed to have an inexhaustible fund of patience and a gift for making his passengers comfortable. I noticed that if it was raining he would run up the stairs to give someone the tip that there was “room inside”. 

With old people he was as considerate as a son,and with children as solicitous as a father. He had evidently a peculiarly warm place in his heart for young people, and always indulged in some merry jest with them. If he had a blind man on board it was not enough to set him down safely on the pavement. He would call to Bill  in front to wait while he took him across the road or round the corner, or otherwise safely on his way. In short, I found that he irradiated such an atmosphere of good-temper and kindliness that a journey with him was a lesson in natural courtesy and good manners. What struck me particularly was the ease with which he got through his work. 

If bad manners are infectious, so also are good manners. If we encounter incivility most of us are apt to become uncivil, but it is an unusually uncouth person who can be disagreeable with sunny people. It is with manners as with the weather. ‘‘Nothing clears up my spirits like a fine day,” said Keats, and a cheerful person descends on even the gloomiest of us with something of the benediction of a fine day. And so it was always fine weather on the polite conductor’s bus, and his own civility, his conciliatory address and good-humoured bearing, infected his passengers. 

In lightening their spirits he lightened his own task. His gaiety was not a wasteful luxury, but a sound investment. I have missed him from my bus route of late; but I hope that only means that he has carried his sunshine on to another road. It cannot be too widely diffused in a rather drab world. And I make no apologies for writing a panegyric on an unknown bus conductor. If Wordsworth could gather lessons of wisdom from the poor leechgatherer ‘on the lonely moor’, I see no reason why lesser people should not take lessons in conduct from one who shows how a very modest calling may be dignified by good-temper and kindly feeling.

 It is a matter of general agreement that the war has had a chilling effect upon those little everyday civilities of behaviour that sweeten the general air. We must get those civilities back if we are to make life kindly and tolerable for each other. We cannot get them back by invoking the law. The policeman is a necessary symbol and the law is a necessary institution for a society that is still somewhat lower than the angels. But the law can only protect us against material attack. Nor will the lift-man’s way of meeting moral affront by physical violence help us to restore the civilities. 

I suggest to him, that he would have had a more subtle and effective revenge if he had treated the gentleman who would not say “Please” with elaborate  politeness. He would have had the victory, not only over the boor, but over himself, and that is the victory that counts. The polite man may lose the material advantage, but he always has the spiritual victory. I commend to the lift-man a story of Chesterfield. In his time the London streets were without the pavements of today, and the man who “took the wall” had the driest footing. 

“I never give the wall to a scoundrel,” said a man who met Chesterfield one day in the street. “I always do,” said Chesterfield, stepping with a bow into the road. I hope the lift-man will agree that his revenge was much more sweet than if he had flung the fellow into the mud. 
- Alfred George Gardiner 

on saying please questions and answers 12th | On saying please pdf

Balbharti Yuvakbharati English 12th Digest Chapter 1.2 On Saying “Please” Notes, Textbook Exercise Important Questions and Answers.
Maharashtra State Board Class 12 English Yuvakbharati Solutions Chapter 1.2 On Saying “Please”
12th English Digest Chapter 1.2 On Saying “Please” Textbook Questions and Answers
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on saying please questions and answers 12th | On saying please pdf

12th English Digest 2021-2022 Section 1 (Prose)

Chapter 1.1 An Astrologer’s Day
Chapter 1.2 On Saying “Please”
Chapter 1.3 The Cop and the Anthem
Chapter 1.4 Big Data-Big Insights
Chapter 1.5 The New Dress
Chapter 1.6 Into the Wild
Chapter 1.7 Why We Travel
Chapter 1.8 Voyaging Towards Excellence

English Yuvakbharati 12th Full Digest Section 2 (Poetry)

Chapter 2.1 Song of the Open Road
Chapter 2.2 Indian Weavers
Chapter 2.3 The Inchcape Rock
Chapter 2.4 Have you Earned Your Tomorrow
Chapter 2.5 Father Returning Home
Chapter 2.6 Money
Chapter 2.7 She Walks in Beauty
Chapter 2.8 Small Towns and Rivers

Yuvakbharati English 12th Digest Guide Section 3 (Writing Skills)

Chapter 3.1 Summary Writing
Chapter 3.2 Do Schools Really Kill Creativity? (Mind-Mapping)
Chapter 3.3 Note–Making
Chapter 3.4 Statement of Purpose
Chapter 3.5 Drafting a Virtual Message
Chapter 3.6 Group Discussion

Yuvakbharati English 12th Textbook Answers Solutions Section 4 (Genre-Drama)

Chapter 4.1 History of Novel
Chapter 4.2 To Sir, with Love
Chapter 4.3 Around the World in Eighty Days
Chapter 4.4 The Sign of Four


Appreciation Of Poem 12th Standard | 12th english all poem appreciation pdf
2.1 Song of the Open Road
2.2 Indian Weavers
2.3 The Inchcape Rock
2.4 Have you Earned your Tomorrow
2.5 Father Returning Home
2.6 Money
2.7 She Walks in Beauty
2.8 Small Towns and Rivers

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